Don Murdoch – 2016

Don Murdoch

Don has been around the folk club for about 14 years and has been playing songs on the guitar for about 40 years. For the past 10 years, he has been learning to actually PLAY the guitar (through private lessons), and learning guitar theory along with the “caged system.”

Workshops:

Songs of Kate Wolf
with Marlene McCall

Despite its brevity, the musical presence of Kate Wolf, beloved Northern California folk singer and songwriter, had a significant impact on the folk music scene, and many musicians continue to cover her songs. Born in San Francisco, she started her music career in the band Wildwood Flower before recording for ten records as a solo artist. Her best-known compositions include Here in California, Across the Great Divide, the Redtail Hawk, and Give Yourself to Love.

Her songs tell stories about the ebb and flow of life. They’re not flashy or exciting, but they’re filled with keen observations, comfort, wisdom, and independence. Looking at life through the eyes of a poet, she describes people, human sentiment, and the rural life of her native Northern California.

She died in 1986, at age 44, after a long battle with leukemia.

Don and Marlene will lead a song circle of Kate Wolf songs. The format will be based on the same general rules employed at many folk club events – that is, going around the circle and giving each person a chance to either lead or request a Kate Wolf song. Anyone who loves Kate’s songs, singer or instrumentalist, is encouraged to come.

Beginning Guitar Theory

This workshop is going to be an introduction about intervals — what they are, and how to use this knowledge to build any type of chord. It really is as simple as counting to seven. I will have handouts explaining the harmonized major scale and what intervals are used in building the different types of chords. My hope is that in one short hour everyone can take something away that they can use right away to start understanding this stuff.

I am planning to just focus on the basic concept of the major scale and how this is really the root of eventually getting a grasp on what we all need to know to get the sounds we want on the guitar. As in all good things it is going to be a slow process and what I don’t want is for anyone to feel overwhelmed or over their head. It might and probably will seem far too simple for some people, but one thing I have found in my own experience is that the most complicated and sophisticated music all starts with the simplest ideas. Please join me and let’s have a fun hour where we can all take something positive away.